Romantic images of the gunfight at the OK Corral have helped make Tombstone famous.
Romantic images of the gunfight at the OK Corral have helped make Tombstone famous.

Back in 1878, when a miner named Ed Schiefflin was searching for silver in the middle of the Sonoran Desert about 100 miles north of the Mexican border, he was frequently told by the soldiers at Fort Huachuca that all he would ever find was his “tombstone.” So he named his first strike and the town that grew up around it Tombstone.

The town hosted many of the wildest outlaws, cowboys, lawmen and prostitutes along with bankers, preachers and school marms. The gunfight at the OK Corral made the Earp brothers, Doc Holliday, the McLaurys and Clantons a legendary part of Ariozna history.

Writer and historian Jane Eppinga will discuss how Tombstone got its reputation as one of the wildest towns in the Wild West in a talk entitled “Tombstone: The Town Too Tough to Die,” at the Arizona Senior Academy on Wednesday (June 22) beginning at 2:30 p.m. Her talk is made possible by a grant from the Arizona Humanities Council’s “AZ Speaks” program.

Jane Eppinga
Jane Eppinga

Eppinga is a prolific author whose writing credentials include over 200 articles for both popular and professional publications, covering a broad spectrum of Arizona history, children’s fiction, travel, personal profiles, biology, construction, food, and public relation pieces.

Her books include a biography of Henry Ossian Flipper, West Point’s First Black Graduate, Arizona Twilight Tales, and books in Arcadia Publishing’s Images of America series, focusing on Arizona towns including Tucson, Nogales, Apache Junction, and Tombstone.

She writes regularly for Biology Digest, a quarterly publication for high school science teachers. In 2009, Globe Pequot published her book, They Made Their Mark: An Illustrated History of the Society of Woman Geographers.

Written by Charles Prewitt, Academy Village Volunteer

 

‘Tombstone: The Town Too Tough to Die’L June2016
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