Six recent TED Talks, streamed over the Internet and presented on the “big screen” in the ASA Great Room, are scheduled for Thursday (Oct. 11), beginning at 3:30 p.m.  TED, which stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, was founded in 1984 to disseminate “ideas worth spreading.” The talks to be presented Thursday are:

Angel Hsu, Danny Hillis, and Kirsty Duncan

“How China is (and isn’t) fighting pollution and climate change,” by Angel Hsu. China is the world’s biggest polluter — and now one of its largest producers of clean energy. Which way will China go in the future, and how will it affect the global environment? Data scientist Angel Hsu describes how the most populous country on earth is creating a future based on alternative energy — and facing up to the environmental catastrophe it created as it rapidly industrialized.

“Should we create a solar shade to cool the earth?” by Danny Hillis. In this perspective-shifting talk, Computer Theorist Danny Hillis prompts us to approach global issues like climate change with creative scientific solutions. Taking a stand for solar geoengineering, he looks at controversial solutions with open-minded curiosity.

“Scientists must be free to learn, to speak and to challenge,” by Kirsty Duncan. “You do not mess with something so fundamental, so precious, as science,” says Kirsty Duncan, Canada’s first Minister of Science. In a heartfelt, inspiring talk about pushing boundaries, she makes the case that researchers must be free to present uncomfortable truths and challenge the thinking of the day — and that we all have a duty to speak up when we see science being stifled or suppressed.

From Left: Burçin Mutlu-Pakdil, Eric Berridge, and Nora Atkinson

“A rare galaxy that’s challenging our understanding of the universe,” by Burçin Mutlu-Pakdil.  What’s it like to discover a galaxy — and have it named after you? Astrophysicist and TED Fellow Burçin Mutlu-Pakdil lets us know in this quick talk about her team’s surprising discovery of a mysterious new galaxy type.

“Why tech needs the humanities,” by Eric Berridge. If you want to build a team of innovative problem-solvers, you should value the humanities just as much as the sciences, says entrepreneur Eric Berridge. He shares why tech companies should look beyond STEM graduates for new hires — and how people with backgrounds in the arts and humanities can bring creativity and insight to technical workplaces.

“Why art thrives at Burning Man,” by Nora Atkinson. Craft curator Nora Atkinson takes us on a trip to Nevada’s Black Rock Desert to see the beautifully designed and participatory art of Burning Man, revealing how she discovered there what’s often missing from museums: curiosity and engagement. “What is art for in our contemporary world if not this?” she asks.

Written by H. Deon Holt, Academy Village Volunteer

More Info on attending an event
Academy Village is an active-adult community located off Old Spanish Trail six miles southeast of Saguaro National Park East. Its residents support the Arizona Senior Academy, a non-profit charitable organization whose mission includes offering free concerts and lectures to the public.

These events are held in the Great Room of The ASA Building adjacent to the Academy Village Community Center. Due to the popularity of cultural events, non-residents who wish to ensure priority seating are advised to make reservations by email at info@arizonasenioracademy.org or by phone at (520) 647-0980. To learn more about the Academy, go to www.asa-tucson.org.

Parking for visitors is in the lot behind the Community Center. All parking spaces in front of the Academy building are reserved.

Oct. 11: From Pollution in China to Art at Burning Man
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